All metal duplex with RV carport in the center


David Oesper
 

Wanted to share this price quote from Lissa - another good option for Mirador or another astronomy village.

Dave

Begin forwarded message:

From: Lissa Bengtson <gneissgoods@...>
Subject: Fwd: Here's Your Custom Design and Estimate! (#1621460695375752)
Date: May 20, 2021 at 6:07:43 AM CDT


We had time yesterday to get a quote on an all-metal duplex with RV carport in the center. The concrete pad would be an additional $18k, not including plumbing, and then each living area would need to be finished out on the inside.  Didn’t want to waste the salesman’s time with details like more windows, or maybe not having concrete under the RV but gravel instead. But it’s a start. 

My phone doesn’t want to forward this to the group, but that would be ok. 

Lissa
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Texwin <mike@...>
Date: Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:45 PM
Subject: Here's Your Custom Design and Estimate! (#1621460695375752)
To: <gneissgoods@...>
CC: <chris.snider@...>


vendor logo

Congratulations on designing your building! Our goal is to exceed your expectations of our service and product. If you have immediate questions or concerns, please contact your local sales rep or dealer.

Carport view 3d iso viewCarport view 3d front viewCarport view 3d left viewCarport view 3d right viewCarport view 3d back view

Carport view 3d floor plan view

Open Your Custom Design


Customer Contact Information

Name: Lisa Bengstson
Phone: 210-627-5940

Dealer Information

Dealer Name: Chris Snider/Athens
Dealer Address: Athens TX
Dealer Email: chris.snider@...
Dealer Phone: 430-901-2533
Sales Rep Name: Chris Snider

Delivery Information

Delivery Location: Default Region
Delivery Address: 1343 W. Lullwood Ave.
Delivery City: San Antonio
Delivery State: TX
Delivery ZIP: 78201

Additional Comments

Contact me: I'm simply exploring building options right now.

The information below is an estimate only. Final pricing - including pricing adjustments, discounts, delivery, and taxes - will be provided with final quote prior to purchase.

Building Estimate: $55,431.00
Sales Tax (6.25%): $3,464.44

Total: $58,895.44

Deposit Amount: $27,715.50
Due Upon Delivery: $31,179.94

Structure Details
Style: Texas Barn -
Installation Surface: Concrete -
Roof: Light Stone* -
Trim: Red* -
Colonial Style (Wainscot): Red* -
Siding: Tan* -
Shutters Color: Red* -
Colonial Style (Wainscot): Red* $1,400.00
Base Price: 20‘x40 $5,195.00
Roof Style: Vertical Standard (Best) -
Roof Pitch: 2/12 -
Roof Overhang: None -
Leg Style: Double Legs -
Gauge: Super Duty Frame $240.00
Brace: 4' Brace -
Engineer Certified: Certified 145 MPH/20 $480.00
Leg Height: 16' $3,965.00
Left Side: Fully Enclosed $1,940.00
Left Side Siding: Vertical -
Right Side: Fully Enclosed $1,940.00
Right Side Siding: Vertical -
Front End: Fully Enclosed $3,155.00
Front End Siding: Vertical -
Back End: Fully Enclosed $3,155.00
Back End Siding: Vertical -
Trusses: Standard -
Approximate center clearance: 17'8" -
Left Lean Colonial Style (Wainscot): Red* -
Left Lean Base Price: 20‘x40 $7,792.50
Left Lean Type: Lean only -
Left Lean Roof Pitch: 2/12 -
Left Lean Gauge: Super Duty Frame $240.00
Left Lean Engineer Certified: Certified 145 MPH/20 $240.00
Left Lean Leg Height: 9' $302.50
Left Lean Left Side: Fully Enclosed $590.00
Left Lean Left Side Siding: Vertical $315.00
Left Lean Front End: Fully Enclosed $1,030.00
Left Lean Front End Siding: Vertical $365.00
Left Lean Back End: Fully Enclosed $1,030.00
Left Lean Back End Siding: Vertical $365.00
Left Lean Connect Fee $200.00
Right Lean Colonial Style (Wainscot): Red* -
Right Lean Base Price: 20‘x40 $7,792.50
Right Lean Type: Lean only -
Right Lean Roof Pitch: 2/12 -
Right Lean Gauge: Super Duty Frame $240.00
Right Lean Engineer Certified: Certified 145 MPH/20 $240.00
Right Lean Leg Height: 9' $302.50
Right Lean Right Side: Fully Enclosed $590.00
Right Lean Right Side Siding: Vertical $315.00
Right Lean Front End: Fully Enclosed $1,030.00
Right Lean Front End Siding: Vertical $365.00
Right Lean Back End: Fully Enclosed $1,030.00
Right Lean Back End Siding: Vertical $365.00
Right Lean Connect Fee $200.00
Doors & Ramps
Walk-In Door (36x80) $225.00
Walk-In Door (36x80) $225.00
Left Lean Double Door 9-Lite (60x72) $700.00
Left Lean Walk-In Door (36x80) $225.00
Right Lean Double Door 9-Lite (60x72) $700.00
Right Lean Walk-In Door (36x80) $225.00
Windows & Accessories
Left Lean 30W x 40H - Insulated (Includes Shutters) $325.00
Left Lean 30W x 40H - Insulated (Includes Shutters) $325.00
Right Lean 30W x 40H - Insulated (Includes Shutters) $325.00
Right Lean 30W x 40H - Insulated (Includes Shutters) $325.00
Frameouts
Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
Custom Size over 12' (15’x14’) $150.00
Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
Custom Size over 12' (15’x14’) $150.00
Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
30"x27" Window $50.00
Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
30"x27" Window $50.00
Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
30"x27" Window $50.00
Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
30"x27" Window $50.00
Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
30"x27" Window $50.00
Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
30"x27" Window $50.00
Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
Left Lean Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
Left Lean Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
Right Lean Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
Right Lean Corner Style: Square (Traditional) -
Additional Options
If a Telescopic Lift is required, customer will provide -
26 Gauge (Upgrade) $4,641.00
Additional Fees
Fee for Side Installation $90.00
Fee for Side Installation $90.00

Pricing and options shown are subject to change at any time and may vary based upon current promotions, specials, or annual pricing adjustments. Current pricing will be included in the final quote and will require your review and approval prior to order.

We will do all we can to ensure your complete satisfaction. Please contact your local dealer or rep for questions, concerns, or custom styles or sizes.

Pricing Table (For Internal Use): - Default Region


Lissa Bengtson
 

To answer Bennet J's questions,  

This duplex design because it affords privacy for both sides.
The labor cost for erecting the building is included in the pricing.  The concrete slab and "flinish-out" is not.
I have no idea what you are referring to in regards to type r-value.  
The installation pricing was for within 100 miles of Athens, Texas.

We have never gotten a price quote before, which is why I submitted this idea.  Now I'm sorry I did.

Lissa


Steve Taylor
 

If I hadn't bought a house at Animas already, we would be going for steel construction, it's just so easy to do. The shell is completely structural, so what you do inside is entirely up to you. 

Steve

On Sun, 23 May 2021, 19:17 Lissa Bengtson, <lissabengtson@...> wrote:
To answer Bennet J's questions,  

This duplex design because it affords privacy for both sides.
The labor cost for erecting the building is included in the pricing.  The concrete slab and "flinish-out" is not.
I have no idea what you are referring to in regards to type r-value.  
The installation pricing was for within 100 miles of Athens, Texas.

We have never gotten a price quote before, which is why I submitted this idea.  Now I'm sorry I did.

Lissa


Sharon Villines
 

From: Lissa Bengtson <gneissgoods@gmail.com>

We had time yesterday to get a quote on an all-metal duplex with RV carport in the center. The concrete pad would be an additional $18k, not including plumbing, and then each living area would need to be finished out on the inside. Didn’t want to waste the salesman’s time with details like more windows, or maybe not having concrete under the RV but gravel instead. But it’s a start.
I find quotes like this to be extremely helpful. The people on the Affordable Cohousing list are still trying to grasp numbers and approaches to building. We have two experienced contractors on the list who are very good at answering questions and offering information but the conversation is still in the how do we get started, where to start phase.

If I could distribute this quote to them, it would be very helpful. Is that possible? I could take off the identifying information and publish it as a dated quote to be used as an example.

People need to see what costs what — windows do add up! Seeing a list like this with total prices and pictures brings everyone down to earth. Last week I said “We need boots on the ground.” And estimates like this are boots on the ground. They help you start talking from minutia which is what construction is. A business plan has to have this level of detail.

“Barndominiums” is misleading because a condominium is a multi-household residential building or building complex. The use here is of barn construction for both human and animal households — half house, half barn. But the pictures include more construction details and actual homes:

https://www.barndominiumlife.com/what-is-a-barndominium/

The Google search on “barn homes” has both luxury and low-cost examples. If you follow the links you can find a lot of information.

https://www.google.com/search?newwindow=1&source=univ&tbm=isch&q=barn+homes&client=safari&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj-6P7TqeLwAhUIU98KHbGSBVwQjJkEegQIBRAB&biw=1146&bih=855

One feature of Groups.io is storage for photos and a database. When cohousing groups start planning the commonhouse they have workshops in which people post pictures of their ideas or even possible ideas for discussion. It helps people focus on what they can live with and what they can’t. It puts boots on the ground — or probably the sand in Mirador’s case. Or clay?

Sharon
———
Sharon Villines
http://affordablecohousing.com
affordablecohousing@groups.io
To subscribe:
affordablecohousing+subscribe@groups.io


Steve Taylor
 

Here's a company I got a material quote from last week, who coincidentally also do complete kit homes - prices are included in the website



On Mon, 24 May 2021 at 11:37, Sharon Villines via groups.io <sharon=sharonvillines.com@groups.io> wrote:
> From: Lissa Bengtson <gneissgoods@...>
>
> We had time yesterday to get a quote on an all-metal duplex with RV carport in the center. The concrete pad would be an additional $18k, not including plumbing, and then each living area would need to be finished out on the inside.  Didn’t want to waste the salesman’s time with details like more windows, or maybe not having concrete under the RV but gravel instead. But it’s a start.

I find quotes like this to be extremely helpful. The people on the Affordable Cohousing list are still trying to grasp numbers and approaches to building. We have two experienced  contractors on the list who are very good at answering questions and offering information but the conversation is still in the how do we get started, where to start phase.

If I could distribute this quote to them, it would be very helpful. Is that possible? I could take off the identifying information and publish it as a dated quote to be used as an example.

People need to see what costs what — windows do add up! Seeing a list like this with total prices and pictures brings everyone down to earth. Last week I said “We need boots on the ground.” And estimates like  this are boots on the ground. They help you start talking from minutia which is what construction is. A business plan has to have this level of detail.

“Barndominiums” is misleading because a condominium is a multi-household residential building or building complex. The use here is of barn construction for both human and animal households — half house, half barn. But the pictures include more construction details and actual homes:

https://www.barndominiumlife.com/what-is-a-barndominium/

The Google search on “barn homes” has both luxury and low-cost examples. If  you follow the links you can find a lot of information.

https://www.google.com/search?newwindow=1&source=univ&tbm=isch&q=barn+homes&client=safari&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj-6P7TqeLwAhUIU98KHbGSBVwQjJkEegQIBRAB&biw=1146&bih=855

One feature of Groups.io is storage for photos and a database. When cohousing groups start planning the commonhouse they have workshops in which people post pictures of their ideas or even possible ideas for discussion. It helps people focus on what they can live with and what they can’t. It puts boots on the ground — or probably the sand in Mirador’s case. Or clay?

Sharon
———
Sharon Villines
http://affordablecohousing.com
affordablecohousing@groups.io
To subscribe:
affordablecohousing+subscribe@groups.io











--
 


Lissa Bengtson
 

Thanks Sharon and Steve.  Sharon--you can distribute the quote...it's just a snapshot in time.  And Steve, Mueller has an excellent reputation around Texas.  Every year they give away a metal building to a non-profit.  They are one of the sponsors of Texas Country Reporter (and Capital Farm Credit is also a sponsor.)

Kicking the tires,
Lissa

On Mon, May 24, 2021 at 12:08 PM Steve Taylor <steveastrouk@...> wrote:
Here's a company I got a material quote from last week, who coincidentally also do complete kit homes - prices are included in the website



On Mon, 24 May 2021 at 11:37, Sharon Villines via groups.io <sharon=sharonvillines.com@groups.io> wrote:
> From: Lissa Bengtson <gneissgoods@...>
>
> We had time yesterday to get a quote on an all-metal duplex with RV carport in the center. The concrete pad would be an additional $18k, not including plumbing, and then each living area would need to be finished out on the inside.  Didn’t want to waste the salesman’s time with details like more windows, or maybe not having concrete under the RV but gravel instead. But it’s a start.

I find quotes like this to be extremely helpful. The people on the Affordable Cohousing list are still trying to grasp numbers and approaches to building. We have two experienced  contractors on the list who are very good at answering questions and offering information but the conversation is still in the how do we get started, where to start phase.

If I could distribute this quote to them, it would be very helpful. Is that possible? I could take off the identifying information and publish it as a dated quote to be used as an example.

People need to see what costs what — windows do add up! Seeing a list like this with total prices and pictures brings everyone down to earth. Last week I said “We need boots on the ground.” And estimates like  this are boots on the ground. They help you start talking from minutia which is what construction is. A business plan has to have this level of detail.

“Barndominiums” is misleading because a condominium is a multi-household residential building or building complex. The use here is of barn construction for both human and animal households — half house, half barn. But the pictures include more construction details and actual homes:

https://www.barndominiumlife.com/what-is-a-barndominium/

The Google search on “barn homes” has both luxury and low-cost examples. If  you follow the links you can find a lot of information.

https://www.google.com/search?newwindow=1&source=univ&tbm=isch&q=barn+homes&client=safari&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj-6P7TqeLwAhUIU98KHbGSBVwQjJkEegQIBRAB&biw=1146&bih=855

One feature of Groups.io is storage for photos and a database. When cohousing groups start planning the commonhouse they have workshops in which people post pictures of their ideas or even possible ideas for discussion. It helps people focus on what they can live with and what they can’t. It puts boots on the ground — or probably the sand in Mirador’s case. Or clay?

Sharon
———
Sharon Villines
http://affordablecohousing.com
affordablecohousing@groups.io
To subscribe:
affordablecohousing+subscribe@groups.io











--
 


Bennett Jones
 

Steve,
One of the big advantages of a steel building is that clear span of open space inside, possible with other types of construction, but a given with a steel building.
While it may be easy, like all other types of construction, there are additional construction challenges when building in remote sites in the desert southwest.
I suggest the main factor for determining the material selected for construction is the balancing of budget vs desired durability.
Next in consideration is the ongoing cost over time, which would include maintenance, repairs, and especially energy costs.
Also of possible concern, is the ability of the building to survive possible extreme weather events and the desired level of security against the unwanted intrusion of human and other biological pests.

We have found what may be the best use of a steel "building" within the desert southwest being the use of the structure (without most of the wall metal) to create an over-roof "umbrella" over a highly insulated living space.
This structure provides: wrap around shading, a larger surface for rain water harvesting, and a mount for a solar PV array.

Attached is a photo of a remote Biological Field Station under construction in the Big Bend of southwest Texas,to illustrate the concept.
The facility is to provide housing for up 14 students and instructors while they are performing studies on-site,

The long axis of the building is oriented true east/west, so we have a true south face (to the right in the photo).
South facing windows will provide some desired heat gain during the cold winter months.

Bennett J.


Steve Taylor
 

Interesting idea. A "Safari roof" for a building. I like the additional functions you get too.

On Wed, 26 May 2021 at 12:42, Bennett Jones via groups.io <byl_liberty=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Steve,
One of the big advantages of a steel building is that clear span of open space inside, possible with other types of construction, but a given with a steel building.
While it may be easy, like all other types of construction, there are additional construction challenges when building in remote sites in the desert southwest.
I suggest the main factor for determining the material selected for construction is the balancing of budget vs desired durability.
Next in consideration is the ongoing cost over time, which would include maintenance, repairs, and especially energy costs.
Also of possible concern, is the ability of the building to survive possible extreme weather events and the desired level of security against the unwanted intrusion of human and other biological pests.

We have found what may be the best use of a steel "building" within the desert southwest being the use of the structure (without most of the wall metal) to create an over-roof "umbrella" over a highly insulated living space.
This structure provides: wrap around shading, a larger surface for rain water harvesting, and a mount for a solar PV array.

Attached is a photo of a remote Biological Field Station under construction in the Big Bend of southwest Texas,to illustrate the concept.
The facility is to provide housing for up 14 students and instructors while they are performing studies on-site,

The long axis of the building is oriented true east/west, so we have a true south face (to the right in the photo).
South facing windows will provide some desired heat gain during the cold winter months.

Bennett J.



--
 


maxeem
 

Cool! I have also heard of good eco friendly ways of insulating below such a roof so that so the sound of heavy rain is muffled instead of cacophonous. Just in case we wanted to do any variation that results in loud drumming noise from rain impacts.


On 5/26/21 9:40 AM, Steve Taylor wrote:
Interesting idea. A "Safari roof" for a building. I like the additional functions you get too.

On Wed, 26 May 2021 at 12:42, Bennett Jones via groups.io <byl_liberty=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Steve,
One of the big advantages of a steel building is that clear span of open space inside, possible with other types of construction, but a given with a steel building.
While it may be easy, like all other types of construction, there are additional construction challenges when building in remote sites in the desert southwest.
I suggest the main factor for determining the material selected for construction is the balancing of budget vs desired durability.
Next in consideration is the ongoing cost over time, which would include maintenance, repairs, and especially energy costs.
Also of possible concern, is the ability of the building to survive possible extreme weather events and the desired level of security against the unwanted intrusion of human and other biological pests.

We have found what may be the best use of a steel "building" within the desert southwest being the use of the structure (without most of the wall metal) to create an over-roof "umbrella" over a highly insulated living space.
This structure provides: wrap around shading, a larger surface for rain water harvesting, and a mount for a solar PV array.

Attached is a photo of a remote Biological Field Station under construction in the Big Bend of southwest Texas,to illustrate the concept.
The facility is to provide housing for up 14 students and instructors while they are performing studies on-site,

The long axis of the building is oriented true east/west, so we have a true south face (to the right in the photo).
South facing windows will provide some desired heat gain during the cold winter months.

Bennett J.


--